Thabiso Goba10 June 2024 | 6:25

MK Party heads to ConCourt in a bid to stop the swearing-in of MPs

The MK Party said it instructed its lawyers to file papers in the apex court to prevent the swearing-in of National Assembly members. 

MK Party heads to ConCourt in a bid to stop the swearing-in of MPs

A man wearing an MK Party shirt attends the Shekainah Healing Ministries Prophetic Pillowcase service where Former President Jacob Zuma is present, in Phillipi, near Cape Town, on March 10, 2024. Picture: A man wearing an MK Party shirt attends the Shekainah Healing Ministries Prophetic Pillowcase service where Former President Jacob Zuma was present, in Phillipi, near Cape Town, on March 10, 2024. Picture: GIANLUIGI GUERCIA / AFP

​JOHANNESBURG - The uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) Party wants to interdict the first sitting of Parliament. 

In a media statement issued on Sunday, the party said it has instructed its lawyers to file papers in the Constitutional Court to prevent the swearing-in of National Assembly members. 

The party, led by Former President Jacob Zuma, said there were many unresolved irregularities regarding the recent general elections.

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- MK Party MPs plan to boycott Parliament until electoral outcome qualms are solved

On Friday, the party wrote to the Chief Justice and the Secretary to Parliament, asking for a delay in the first sitting of Parliament, as it intended to challenge the validity of the 2024 general election results. 

MK says if its 58 members did not attend the first sitting, a quorum would not be met. 

However, Secretary to Parliament Xolile George previously told Eyewitness News that only 134 members were needed to reach a quorum. 

"For passing bills and any matters you need majority of members but for any other matter, you need one third of matters of that house, that house being the National Assembly."

Chief Justice Raymond Zondo is expected to announce the first sitting of Parliament this week. Zondo will preside over the election of the deputy speaker and Speaker of Parliament.